Dispatches from Outland
A little song. A little dance. A little seltzer down your pants. Copyright © 2003 Roy M. Jacobsen.


Thursday, February 26, 2004  

Perfectly Pellucid Department: Soundfury provides one of the best defenses of traditional marriage that I've seen in a while.

So how does a gay marriage impact me and my wife? Because it not only advances the prima facie falsehood that they are equal, but I am compelled to see the two as equivalent.

But why would I be required to respect their union? What makes marriage meaningful is its use as a form of social currency. When two people are married, it is a public confession of the most private relationship; furthermore, it is a mandatory, compulsory public endorsement thereof. In other words, when two people marry (apparently I’m not to use “man and woman” anymore), no matter how badly anybody (even their closest friends and family!) would dispute it, they have promised their affections to one another, and society is required to honor it. Sorry, guys, but nothing doing.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 12:47 PM
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Monday, February 23, 2004  

Chew On Some Meat Department: I've never read Kierkegaard, but the folks at Bruderhof want to remedy that. They've made the book Provocations: Spiritual Writings of Søren Kierkegaard available as a free PDF. The editor of this collection, Charles E. Moore, says "this collection is meant to present in as concise a way as possible the “heart” of Kierkegaard."

Kierkegaard wrote industriously and rapidly, and under a variety
of pen-names, presenting various esthetic, ethical, and religious viewpoints on life. His writings display such a wide range of genre and style, and his thought covers such a variety of subjects that even he himself felt compelled to write a book to explain his agenda. Despite this, Kierkegaard was single mindedly driven. He writes in his Journal: “The category for my undertaking is: to make people aware of what is essentially Christian.”

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 1:24 PM
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