Dispatches from Outland
A little song. A little dance. A little seltzer down your pants. Copyright © 2003 Roy M. Jacobsen.


Saturday, June 15, 2002  

I'm taking my family on a two-week outing to Mackinac Island, Michagan, and Chicago area. So starting tomorrow, you'll have to get your bloggy goodness from the links. God speed.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 10:17 PM
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Friday, June 14, 2002  

Rich Galen offers some observations on small businesses, and the people who own them.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 9:01 AM
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I recently discovered this website: antithesis: a voice from the emerging christian counterculture. Looks like good stuff. Hey, they like Francis Sheaffer, so that's a good thing.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 8:38 AM
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Thursday, June 13, 2002  

Doug Sirman (of Sirman on the Mount fame) has had a heart attack. Latest word (via Mark Shea) is that he's expecting to make a full recovery. Please pray for Doug and his family.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 8:40 AM
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Back To The Garden Department Mark Byron took the time to respond to the Christianity Today article on Wendell Berry and agrarianism. (Thanks, Mark.) In hindsight, I think I was hesitant to weigh in on this because my thoughts are very deeply influenced by my upbringing on a family farm, in a very small agricultural community, in an agriculturally dependant state. My younger brother is now operating the family farm, so I hear and see the things he struggles with. Family farms can be a wonderful thing, but, bloody hell, it's hard to make a living producing a commodity.

I'll try to put some more thoughts together on this.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 8:33 AM
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Call Things What They Really Are Department: Cal Thomas has a column about Martin and Gracia Burnham over at Townhall.com. Here's the bit that really hit home for me:

Some American Christians think they are being persecuted when a newspaper editorial criticizes what they're doing in the political arena. Perhaps they should change places with missionaries like the Burnhams and experience what real persecution looks and feels like.

Persecution. As Inigo Montoya said, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 8:18 AM
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Wednesday, June 12, 2002  

Airline Security and Other Oxymorons Department: The inimitable William Buckley muses on the state of airline security.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 9:49 AM
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Tuesday, June 11, 2002  

If It Looks Like A Duck Department: Louder Fenn has a couple of essays -- number one is here and number two is here -- on euthanasia.

The Constitution says that no one may be deprived of life without due process of law. This means that a doctor may not kill someone and then, after the fact, seek protection under some statute. There was no due process: There was only the deprivation of life. The due process, such as it is, is ex post facto.

More fundamental is the principle represented by the due process clause: That no individual may commit lethal violence against another individual. Cloak it as much as you want in notions of "compassion," but euthanasia is still lethal violence: A human being is killed. By his doctor, no less. But a doctor is not an officer of the state. Only the state, after due process of law, may commit lethal violence. Whether even the state should have such power is another question; but it is well established that individuals do not have such power. It is, indeed, a hallmark of civilization that you may not, for example, hunt down and kill the killer of your family.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 8:38 AM
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Back to the Garden Department: Christianity Today Magazine has an article about agrarianism, and its current prophet, Wendell Berry.

I admit that my thinking on this issue--industrialism vs. agrarianism--is a bit muddled. On the one hand, it seems to me that much of our country's prosperity can be attributed to its ethic, which is heavily colored by capitalism. With the increase in our prosperity has come improved quality of life. (The adventures of the families in PBS's Frontier House, who were attempting to live an agrarian lifestyle, is evidence of that.) By many measures, the environment has been improving over the last couple of decades.

On the other hand, Berry's vision is in many respects a compelling one. I need to consider this more.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 7:55 AM
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