Dispatches from Outland
A little song. A little dance. A little seltzer down your pants. Copyright © 2003 Roy M. Jacobsen.


Friday, April 12, 2002  

Another quote for today, from OpinionJournal's Best of the Web Today:

The Marshall Plan made sense only after the martial plan had succeeded.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 2:43 PM
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Peggy Noonan has muc to say about fighting and prayer.

Prayer is the hardest thing. And no one congratulates you for doing it because no one knows you're doing it, and if things turn out well they likely won't thank God in any case. But I have a feeling that the hardest thing is what we all better be doing now, and that it's not only the best answer but the only one.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 11:37 AM
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Nice piece on The New Sophists over at Unremitting Verse.

(Nota bene: Bookmark that site.)

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 11:25 AM
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David Brooks has some links to good sources of info about what's going on in Israel here: Media Blackout.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 11:25 AM
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Song of the day:
Bone in My Ear by Bruce Cockburn.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 9:55 AM
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Random quote of the day:

Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life. -- Conficius

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 9:49 AM
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Ramesh Ponnuru tackles the arguments in favor of therapeutic cloning. Sort of makes me say "Yeah. What he said."

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 9:23 AM
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An open letter to Glenn Reynolds:

Glenn,
In your Cloning Update today, you quote Virginia Postrel saying the president's speech was "calculated to appeal to those who believe a fertilized egg is a person." It appears that you don't believe that a "fertilized egg is a person." Would you mind explaining exactly when a person comes into being? Or would you rather go into the scientific reasons why a fertilized egg is not a person? Either one would be a good start, but thus far, I've not seen any real compelling arguments against "a fertilized egg is a person," nor any coherent arguments as to what later point a person comes into being.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 8:53 AM
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Thursday, April 11, 2002  

Song of the Day:
I Love You # 19 by Daniel Amos.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 10:08 AM
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Quote of the Day:

The people who hanged Christ never accused him of being a bore -- on the contrary they thought him too dynamic to be safe. -- Dorothy L. Sayers

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 10:06 AM
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I take Jesus' words about the thief in the night very seriously. "So you also must be ready, because the Son of Man will come at an hour when you do not expect him." (Matthew 24:44) Thus, anytime anyone starts saying "The End Is Near! (TM)" I tend to take it with a grain of salt. And if they're presumptuous enough to start making predictions, then I'm willing to place bets against them being right.

Nonetheless, when a red heifer is born in Israel, that's an event that catches my attention.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 9:54 AM
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Wednesday, April 10, 2002  

Band of the Day:
Iona.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 10:55 AM
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Quote of the Day:

A poem is a distillation of words nibbling at the edge of something vast. -- William Kloefkorn

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 10:53 AM
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Cold pizza for breakfast was a concept that took me a bit to accept, perhaps because early idea of pizza was not very realistic. Growing up in a farm family, with a meat-and-potatoes kind of father, might have had something to do with that. That, or the fact that the only pizza we ever had was Chef Boy-ar-dee. Chef Boy-ar-dee cheese pizzas were never much to begin with, and mom would add some browned hambuger, so the end result was -- to borrow Douglas Adams' phrase -- almost, but not totally, unlike pizza.

I was introduced to real pizza by friends at college, and I am eternally grateful. But when they tried to tell me that cold pizza was good for breakfast, my initial reaction was "you've got to be kidding." Here again, my notions of what breakfast was supposed to be were deeply colored by my upbringing. We usually had cold cereal: Wheaties, Corn Flakes, or Cheerios were the triumvirate, though there were occasional interlopers. (Does anyone else remember Clackers?) During the winter, dad would sometimes make Malt-o-meal, or pancakes, and we could have fried eggs and toast if we wanted.

But pizza for breakfast? Cold? That just wasn't "How It Was Done." (TM)

Then I tried it. It was just one of many subtle, but significant mind-shifts that seem to focus around one main theme: Just because something is dramatically different from what you've done before doesn't mean it should be rejected off-hand. It also doesn't mean you should accept it uncritically.

I'm rambling a bit, so I'll finally come to my point (and yes, I really have one). Our church recently hired a part-time "Worship Director." (I say we hired him, but it was really a package deal: his wife helps as well. Kind of like how you don't just call a pastor, you call the pastor and his wife.) He's a music instructor at a local university, specializing in jazz guitar. He's an excellent musician, and he and his wife have done a good job of putting together "blended" services. (It's an attempt to compromise between a traditional service, heavy on hymns with piano and organ, and a contemporary service, with "praise" music and guitar/bass/drums/etc. instrumentation.)

It's a truism that, if you want to stir up trouble in a church, change the style of worship. We've managed to avoid that, for the most part. Some of our members have said they'd prefer a purely traditional service, but are willing to "put up with" the format because they recognize that different people have different tastes. But some can be pushed too far, and don't seem to recognize the part that personal preference plays. Kind of my previously held belief that "You just don't eat cold pizza for breakfast." So how does one proceed when it appears that someone has confused opinion with Immutable Truth?

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 10:45 AM
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Tuesday, April 09, 2002  

Quote of the day:

A man can no more diminish God's glory by refusing to worship Him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling "darkness" on the walls of his cell. -- C.S. Lewis

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 9:12 AM
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Song of the day:
He's Always Been Faithful by Sara Groves.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 9:09 AM
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Monday, April 08, 2002  

Three cheers for Cuss Control! This is an idea whose time is long past due.

posted by Roy M. Jacobsen at 7:06 PM
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